Tell us what your name means
  • As they say, the most beautiful sound in the world to someone is the sound of their name.

    Everyday I see so many names from around the world in our translators community, and it makes me wonder, what do they mean in their language?

    If you like, share with us the origin and meaning of your name. :)


  • 20 Comments sorted by
  • Ha ha, perfect equilibrium! :)


    Dimitra, Δήμητρα: \d(i)-mit-ra, dim(i)-tra\ comes from the ancient Greek goddess Demeter.
    The word Demeter derives from the Greek words Gi (Gaia - Earth/Γη) and Mitra (Womb - Μήτρα). The name Dimitra or Demeter as it mostly appears in Latin and English refers to the one born from mother earth.

    The male version is Dimitris (Demetrius). For the Orthodox Church the name has its origins in Saint Dimitrios (Agios Dimitrios), or Saint Demetrius as he is mostly known in Latin, a martyr of Christianity that lived in the early 4th century AD.


    My surname simply means 'Priest George'. Maybe one of my ancestors was a priest.
    'Papa-' (priest) is very common in Greek surnames.


    As for my nickname, Isiliel, it means 'daughter of the moon' in Elvish language Quenya.
    In Elvish, 'Isil' is the moon. :P

  • My family name 青木 (Aoki) means “blue tree” and my given name 靖 (Yasushi) means “calm”. We place names in the order of family name-given name in Japanese, so I write my name as 青木靖.
  • Krystian Patryk Aparta. My first name means "follower of Christ." I should point out that I'm an atheist, and I do tend to lead. My middle name means "nobleman." I sometimes joke that it's the more fitting one, since my dad's name is Eugeniusz - Eugene, meaning "well born." Or something about eugenics... My last name is a little difficult. It's very rare in Poland, only about 25 living people have it, and there are some people in Germany by that name - my grandfather's family had emigrated from Germany in the 19th century (and back then, the name was Haparta and Haparte in some old books that my dad tracked down). There also seem to be quite a few people in the Philippines with that name, which I think is due to the parallel evolution of those names in two different cultures! As far as the meaning goes, your guess is as good as mine.
  • My first name, Ivana, is a biblical one as well, it means something like "dear to God".
    My last name, Korom, is Hungarian, and it means ashes or soot, grime in the chimney.
    So I am Ashes, dear to God. Ashes to ashes... well, things come to mind now.

    (But if the same word is written like this: köröm it means fingernails.)
  • <blockquote class="UserQuote"><div class="QuoteAuthor"><a href="/profile/ElsDK" rel="nofollow">ElsDK</a> said:</div><div class="QuoteText"><p>
    Petra is the female form of Petrus, Piet or Pieter (Dutch, my brother's name), Pierre (French Pierre, my godfather's name, after whom I was named) and all their friends. Petra is Greek for 'rock'. Petrus is the name Jesus gave to his apostle Simon, 'the rock upon which he would build his church'. Yep, I am a rock.</p></div></blockquote>

    Els, you rock!

  • Eliisabeth is something like God's promise, and my family name Buffard comes from a nickname for angry or quarrelsome people ... Quite a combination, right?
  • Michele comes from the Hebrew Mikha'el,
    and its modest meaning is : "Who is like God"?
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael)

    Not sure about my second name, Gianella, but it's very similar to "Janela", which means "window" in Portuguese :)

    Ciao!
  • Anna comes from Hebrew meaning grace, favour.
    I don't want to spoil the game, so I'll let Krystian explain my second name Cristiana.
  • My name was actually made up for a book, so it doesn't mean anything. Sort of like "Wendy", which was created by J.M. Barrie for Peter Pan. Sorry! ;-)
  • So there is a book out there with your unique name? This is awesome!
  • My name Olga [Ольга] derives from the Old Norse and Scandinavian name Helga, which in its turn derives from Old Norse heilagr - "holy", "blessed".
    My last name - Dmitrochenkova - was formed according to a pretty widespread pattern for Russian surnames. At the heart of the surname we see the name or nickname of a distant male ancestor. In my case this ancestor's name is Dmitry. Dimitra brilliantly explained its origin! :)
  • Els Petra De Keyser

    Els is short for Elisabeth.

    Petra is the female form of Petrus, Piet or Pieter (Dutch, my brother's name), Pierre (French Pierre, my godfather's name, after whom I was named) and all their friends. Petra is Greek for 'rock'. Petrus is the name Jesus gave to his apostle Simon, 'the rock upon which he would build his church'. Yep, I am a rock.

    'De Keyser' is a very common surname. It is derived from Caesar. The literal translation 'the emperor' is a bit of an exaggeration. The title most likely stems from the medieval archer's guilds, which is somewhat less glorious.
  • My name, Delia, comes from Greek meaning "of Delos", and was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. I also found it in sources that state it has Celtic, German, or Welsh origin as shortened form of Bedelia \b(e)-de-lia\ which is an English language rendering of an Irish language girl's name, thus of different origin than Greek or Latin. B-)
    My last name, Bogdan, just found out now, has a Slavic origin and it means "given by God" from the Slavic elements "bog" = god and "dan" = given. After other sources means "gift of God", so pretty much the same.
  • first, last or both?
  • Whichever you prefer. Why not both? ;)
  • To tell you the truth I never thought of searching my second name either. It was only today that I gave it a try.
  • For me, it was a serendipitous thing. I decided to took Portuguese lessons at the University, and one day I had my Eureka moment :)
  • <blockquote class="UserQuote"><div class="QuoteAuthor"><a href="/profile/Anna_Minoli" rel="nofollow">Anna_Minoli</a> said:</div><div class="QuoteText"><p>Anna comes from Hebrew meaning grace, favour.
    I don't want to spoil the game, so I'll let Krystian explain my second name Cristiana.</p></div></blockquote>

    Anna's middle name means that I own her.
    Actually, the name is the same as my first name, just female. However, Polish has cases, and adjectives and nouns (including proper names) change to express different grammatical meanings. The Genitive is often used with the sense of "part of/belong to," and the Polish Genitive for "Krystian" is "Krystiana." In Polish, for "Anna, Krystian's friend" you would say "Anna, przyjaciółka Krystiana" (or, while this is a stretch, the syntax is flexible enough to allow you to say "Anna, Krystiana przyjaciółka," although this sounds contrived and suggests something like contrasting Anna the friend with a different Anna).
  • @dobedobedooo - your last name is also a male Slavic first name. I know at least one person by that name in Poland :)
  • Greetings,
    My full name is " Anwar FatihElrahman Ahmed Dafa-Alla" ...
    Given name:Anwar means More lighter... origin is Nour = Light
    Father name: FatihElrahman means the victory of God
    Ahmed : is one of our prophet's name
    Family name: Dafa-Alla means the gift of God

    Really interesting to read about your names...and thanks Dimitra for this thread :)